Frauulent “Organic” Grain Coming from Black Sea

Cornucopia presents two article illuminating the situation of what may be imported grain fraud on a massive scale. Jim

“During the third week in May 2016, the Nakagowa — a cargo ship docked in Indiana on Lake Michigan with a cargo of 450,000 bushels of supposedly organic corn. The Nakagowa took on that cargo from a Turkish port, a fact that raised even larger questions about the “organic integrity” of the shipment. Other reports indicate that additional ships docked on the East Coast with similar “organic” grain cargos. These combined “organic” cargoes resulted in dumping up to 1.2 million bushels of corn on the U.S. organic market. That’s an amount equal to 336 rail cars of organic grain…

“Import volumes have impacted the entire organic grain market. Food-grade wheat, corn and soybean markets have dropped by $5 to $6 per bushel from price levels seen only 18 months ago. Feed-grade grains have fared no better, with prices falling similar amounts for the major grains and $2-$3 on small grains. Low corn and soybean prices have also stifled a once-bustling, small-grain feed business, causing large backlogs of oats…

“USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service, in a January 26, 2016 report, stated ‘As organic production and consumption in Turkey grow, so too do the concerns about fraudulent organic products and lack of inspections.’ According to a EUROPOL report, some Turkish companies have been involved in relabeling or repackaging products as organic and bringing the counterfeit products into the European Union, even though the products do not meet the organic standards…

“The U.S. organic industry has long touted 14% annual growth. USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS) data shows that 40% of organic corn and up to 70% of organic soybeans processed or fed to livestock and poultry in this naiton are imported.”

http://www.cornucopia.org/2016/09/organic-grain-imports-threaten-domestic-markets-standards/?utm_source=eNews&utm_medium=email&utm_content=10.1.16&utm_campaign=GrainMORE