Organic Farming Aligned with Conservative Values

Jim makes some good points that good organic farming represents a lot of values which should make conservatives happy. And Jim also explains that soil-less hydroponics DOES NOT MEET THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE ORGANIC LABELING LAW.

“Riddle, a 60-year-old who grew up on an Iowa farm and now raises berries in Minnesota, says there’s an unclaimed common ground between organics and conservatives.

“His own perspective is certified organic. For 20 years he was an organic inspector, one of those folks who show up at least once a year to determine if certified farms really do merit the federally approved organic label by avoiding harmful pesticides and genetically modified seeds, among many other strictures…

“‘In part, I want to talk about how organic values are conservative values,’ he said. ‘At its core, organic farming is pro-life. From the ground up, it’s about keeping things alive – the seeds, the soil health, pollinators and wildlife. It embraces all species at all levels of farming.

“‘And I also want to say that organic farming is really free-market farming. It’s farming the land in response to consumer demand. The demand for organic products is skyrocketing by double-digits each year. But because organic crop rotations are more complex methods, there typically aren’t government subsidies. That matches really well with the conservative agenda.

“‘The organic community went to the government and said it wanted standards that protect the word organic, and it worked really well. We’re really a model for self-regulation with clear, strong, transparent standards and protection of the word organic.’

Riddle believes organic food corresponds to the perceived conservative values of heightened personal responsibility.

“‘We are what we eat,’ he said. ‘If it’s junk, you have lots of health problems. If you eat clean and live a smart life, your health improves and you’re less of a cost to society'”…

“Riddle, along with major players in the organic community, also worries about the rise in hydroponically grown products being labeled as organic.

“‘It’s right in the law that the term organic means it enhances the health of the soil. If there’s no soil, how can you apply the term? It’s misleading to the consumer. It’s fine if they want to label the products as pesticide-free, but hydroponic growers shouldn’t be cashing in on the organic market.'”

http://www.cleveland.com/cooking/index.ssf/2017/02/organic_leader_jim_riddle_seek.html